Theories of learning: Sensory Stimulation Theory

Theories of learning: Sensory Stimulation Theory

Traditional sensory stimulation theory has as its basic premise that effective learning occurs when the senses are stimulated (Laird, 1985). Laird quotes research that found that the vast majority of knowledge held by adults (75%) is learned through seeing. Hearing is the next most effective (about 13%) and the other senses – touch, smell and taste account for 12% of what we know. By stimulating the senses, especially the visual sense, learning can be enhanced. However, this theory says that if multi-senses are stimulated, greater learning takes place. Stimulation through the senses is achieved through a greater variety of colours, volume levels, strong statements, facts presented visually, use of a variety of techniques and media.

This theory states that when all or multiple senses are stimulated, a learning experience can be effectively enhanced. The use of stimulation through visuals, colour, sound and other techniques provide the individual with a heightened sensory learning experience that is more engaging than a single stimulation.

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